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Sep 04, 2017
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Sep 23, 2017
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Oct 04, 2017
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Oct 09, 2017
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Oct 25, 2017
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Retiree Corner
Aug 21, 2017

    Early Registration for All Craft Conference &              Retirees Conference Extended to Sept. 8

WEB NEWS ARTICLE #: 
77-2017

08/18/2017 - Early registration for the All Craft Conference and the Retirees Conference has been extended until September 8, 2017.  The cost is $85 for the All Craft Conference and $40 for the Retirees Conference.  After September 8, 2017, the cost for the All Craft Conference is $135 and $45 for the Retirees Conference.

The deadline for the submission of resolutions is September 2, 2017.

The 2017 All Craft Conference will be held Oct. 2-4, 2017 at Bally’s Las Vegas Hotel. Here is a link to the schedule.

·         The Legislative Conference will be held Oct. 1. Click here to view the schedule. 

·         The Retirees Conference will be held Oct.2-4. Click here to view the schedule. 

Registration Fees and Information

·         Click here for registration for the All Craft Conference. The cost is $85 for early (by Friday, Sept. 8 at 5:00 pm EST) and $135 for late.

·         Click here for registration for the Retirees Conference.  The cost is $40 for early (by Friday, Sept. 8 at 5:00 pm EST) and $45 for late.

·         Click here for registration for the Legislative Conference and Training.  The cost is $45 for Track 1 and $55 for Track 2.  Both tracks include admission to the Legislative Conference General Session and the Regional Breakouts.  A schedule of events, including the workshops offered for each track, can be found here.

In accordance with the APWU Constitution and Bylaws [PDF]resolutions must be received by Saturday, September 2, 2017, to be considered at the conference. There will be no exceptions. Resolutions are accepted from local or state affiliates, or from Members-at-Large (MALs).

Resolutions from local or state affiliates must be submitted online no later than Saturday, September 2, 2017 using the template below. This form is accessible only to presidents, secretaries, and secretary-treasurers. 

Click here to submit resolutions.

MALs are the only individuals who may submit resolutions under their own signatures. Resolutions from MALs must be sent directly to Secretary-Treasurer Elizabeth “Liz” Powell. They must be typed, double-spaced and submitted individually (one resolution per page) to 1300 L Street, NW, Washington, DC 20005.

If you have any questions, please contact Hannah Lively at hlively@apwu.org.


Aug 15, 2017

For CSRS Retirees:

The 2018 CSRS retiree COLA is based on the third quarter (July, August, September) average CPI-W index (1982-84=100) in 2017 over the 2016 third quarter average. After the second quarter of 2017, the third quarter for the 2018 COLA adjustment period, the quarterly average has risen by 1.5%.

CSRS COLA

CSRS COLA

1995

2.8%

2008

2.3%

1996

2.6%

2009

5.8%

1997

2.9%

2010

0%

1998

2.1%

2011

0%

1999

1.3%

2012

3.6%

2000

2.4%

2013

1.7%

2001

3.5%

2014

1.5%

2002

2.6%

2015

1.7%

2003

1.4%

2016

0%

2004

2.1%

2017

0.3%

2005

2.7%

2018

2006

4.1%

2007

3.3%


For FERS Retirees:

The 2018 FERS retiree COLA is based on the third quarter (July, August, September) average CPI-W index (1982-84=100) in 2017 over the 2016 third quarter average. However, if the CPI-W quarterly average increases 3% or more, they subtract 1%. A 5% increase in the quarterly CPI-W average results in a 4% adjustment. If the quarterly average increases from 2% to 3%, benefits increase by 2%. A CPI-W quarterly average increase of 2% or less will increase benefits by the change in the CPI-W quarterly average. After the second quarter of 2017, the third quarter for the 2018 COLA adjustment period, the quarterly average has risen by 1.5%.

FERS COLA

FERS COLA

 1995

2.0%

2008

2.0%

1996

2.0%

2009

4.8%

1997

2.0%

2010

0.0%

1998

2.0%

2011

0.0%

1999

1.3%

2012

2.6%

2000

2.0%

2013

1.7%

2001

2.5%

2014

1.5%

2002

2.0%

2015

1.7%

2003

1.4%

2016

0%

2004

2.0%

2017

0.3%

2005

2.0%

2018

2006

3.1%

2007

2.3%


For Social Security Recipients:

The 2018 Social Security COLA is based on the third quarter (July, August, September) average CPI-W index (1982-84=100) in 2017 over the 2016 third quarter average. After the second quarter of 2017, the third quarter for the 2018 COLA adjustment period, the quarterly average has risen by 1.5%.

Social Security

Social Security

1995

2.8%

2008

2.3%

1996

2.6%

2009

5.8%

1997

2.9%

2010

0.0%

1998

2.1%

2011

0.0%

1999

1.3%

2012

3.6%

2000

2.4%

2013

1.7%

2001

3.5%

2014

1.5%

2002

2.6%

2015

1.7%

2003

1.4%

2016

0%

2004

2.1%

2017

0.3%

2005

2.7%

2018

2006

4.1%

2007

3.3%


For FECA Employees:

The percentage increase in the December CPI-W (1982-84=100) index from year to year determines the FECA COLA increase. After the sixth month of the 12-month measuring period for the 2018 FECA COLA the index rose 1.454%.

FECA COLA

1995

2.7%

2008

4.3%

1996

2.5%

2009

0.0%

1997

3.3%

2010

3.4%

1998

1.5%

2011

1.7%

1999

1.6%

2012

3.2%

2000

2.7%

2013

1.7%

2001

3.4%

2014

1.5%

2002

1.3%

2015

0.3%

2003

2.4%

2016

0.4%

2004

1.6%

2017

2.0%

2005

3.4%

2018

2006

3.5%

2007

2.4%

 
 

Jul 24, 2017

House Budget Goes Beyond White House Blueprint

WEB NEWS ARTICLE #: 
71-2017

07/21/2017 

On July 19, the House Budget Committee advanced its Fiscal Year 2018 budget resolution. As anticipated, the 2018 House Budget is in the same mold as the White House budget – it punishes workers and the working-class, while giving big payouts to the rich. The resolution instructs the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee (which has jurisdiction over the Postal Service and postal/federal employee annuity benefits) to cut $32 billion in the programs and agencies they oversee during ten years.

Like the White House proposal, the House budget recommends big pay cuts to postal workers through increased Federal Employee Retirement System pension contributions and eliminating the special retirement supplement (which helps federal retirees who retire before they are eligible for Social Security benefits). These two proposals alone will take thousands of dollars out of the pockets of postal workers and retirees.

Even more egregious, the House plan calls for replacing guaranteed pension benefits for new hires with riskier 401(k) “retirement” benefits. Postal workers’ retirement savings will be entirely at the whim of the stock market and Wall Street financiers.

The APWU also remains concerned that in the Oversight Committee’s effort to cut $32 billion they may reduce Cost of Living Adjustments (COLAs) for retirees, as suggested in the White House 2018 Budget Proposals.

These and many other cuts to critical government services would be used to bankroll huge tax cuts for the wealthiest few.

“It’s a stick up,” said President Mark Dimondstein. “They plan to come into our homes and rob us of $3,000-$4,000 a year. Then they want to come back next year, and every year thereafter, and do it again.”

One Atrocious Step Further

In addition to the cuts above, the 2018 House Budget also calls to move the Postal Service from “off budget” to “on budget,” even though it operates without taxpayer money. This would be a disaster, because being “on budget” would put caps on its expenditures, let Congress dictate how the Postal Service could spend their money and would make it subject to federal government shutdowns. If this is able to stand, the Postal Service will be a prime target for cuts and could result in the further degradation of service. Further, being “on budget” could make the Postal Service a cash cow, with cuts to the USPS budget to pay for non-postal related government expenses.

Instead of providing improved services and investing in infrastructure, Congress could take the Postal Service’s operating budget and use it for any purpose, including funding massive tax breaks for corporations and the CEOs who run them.

“All Hands on Deck”

On Tuesday, July 18, APWU members were on the front line protecting our livelihoods from budget attacks. As part of our joint Day of Action with the Federal-Postal Coalition, APWU sisters and brothers made over 5,000 calls in 24 hours to congressional offices.

Together, we urged members of Congress to reject any federal budget proposal including devastating cuts to our pay and benefits. We told our representatives to oppose any budget balanced on the backs of workers.

“A big thank you to everyone who participated in our Day of Action and for your continued efforts,” said Legislative and Political Director Judy Beard. “However our work did not end on the Day of Action -- this budget must be defeated! The phone lines remain open to connect you to your Member of Congress. Our solidarity and collective action is paramount if we are to defeat these budget attacks.”

“Call both 1-844-813-4060 [DC office] and 1-844-402-1001 [district office],” Director Beard continued, “and tell your representative that postal and federal workers will not be a piggy bank to finance massive tax cuts for the rich!”


Feb 16, 2017

For CSRS Retirees:

The 2018 CSRS retiree COLA is based on the third quarter (July, August, September) average CPI-W index (1982-84=100) in 2017 over the 2016 third quarter average. After the fourth quarter of 2016, the first quarter for the 2018 COLA adjustment period, the quarterly average has risen slightly by 0.2%.

CSRS COLA

CSRS COLA

1995

2.8%

2008

2.3%

1996

2.6%

2009

5.8%

1997

2.9%

2010

0%

1998

2.1%

2011

0%

1999

1.3%

2012

3.6%

2000

2.4%

2013

1.7%

2001

3.5%

2014

1.5%

2002

2.6%

2015

1.7%

2003

1.4%

2016

0%

2004

2.1%

2017

0.3%

2005

2.7%

2018

2006

4.1%

2007

3.3%


For FERS Retirees:

The 2018 FERS retiree COLA is based on the third quarter (July, August, September) average CPI-W index (1982-84=100) in 2017 over the 2016 third quarter average. However, if the CPI-W quarterly average increases 3% or more, they subtract 1%. A 5% increase in the quarterly CPI-W average results in a 4% adjustment. If the quarterly average increases from 2% to 3%, benefits increase by 2%. A CPI-W quarterly average increase of 2% or less will increase benefits by the change in the CPI-W quarterly average. After the fourth quarter of 2016, the first quarter for the 2018 COLA adjustment period, the quarterly average has risen slightly by 0.2%.

FERS COLA

FERS COLA

 1995

2.0%

2008

2.0%

1996

2.0%

2009

4.8%

1997

2.0%

2010

0.0%

1998

2.0%

2011

0.0%

1999

1.3%

2012

2.6%

2000

2.0%

2013

1.7%

2001

2.5%

2014

1.5%

2002

2.0%

2015

1.7%

2003

1.4%

2016

0%

2004

2.0%

2017

0.3%

2005

2.0%

2018

2006

3.1%

2007

2.3%


For Social Security Recipients:

The 2018 Social Security COLA is based on the third quarter (July, August, September) average CPI-W index (1982-84=100) in 2017 over the 2016 third quarter average. After the fourth quarter of 2016, the first quarter for the 2018 COLA adjustment period, the quarterly average has risen slightly by 0.2%.

Social Security

Social Security

1995

2.8%

2008

2.3%

1996

2.6%

2009

5.8%

1997

2.9%

2010

0.0%

1998

2.1%

2011

0.0%

1999

1.3%

2012

3.6%

2000

2.4%

2013

1.7%

2001

3.5%

2014

1.5%

2002

2.6%

2015

1.7%

2003

1.4%

2016

0%

2004

2.1%

2017

0.3%

2005

2.7%

2018

2006

4.1%

2007

3.3%


For FECA Employees:

The percentage increase in the December CPI-W (1982-84=100) index from year to year determines the FECA COLA increase.  After the first month of the 12-month measuring period for the 2018 FECA COLA the index rose 0.622%.

FECA COLA

1995

2.7%

2008

4.3%

1996

2.5%

2009

0.0%

1997

3.3%

2010

3.4%

1998

1.5%

2011

1.7%

1999

1.6%

2012

3.2%

2000

2.7%

2013

1.7%

2001

3.4%

2014

1.5%

2002

1.3%

2015

0.3%

2003

2.4%

2016

0.4%

2004

1.6%

2017

2.0%

2005

3.4%

2018

2006

3.5%

2007

2.4%


Jan 07, 2015

Postal Retirement Benefits

The APWU and other federal unions have worked with Congress for many decades to ensure retirement income security for employees who spend their careers in government service.

Today, most postal employees are eligible to participate in one of two federal retirement benefit programs:

The Civil Service Retirement System (CSRS), which provides benefits for most workers hired before 1984.

The Federal Employee Retirement System (FERS), which covers all workers hired after 1984.

Though FERS pays a smaller monthly benefit than CSRS, FERS retirees also receive Social Security and Thrift Savings Plan payments.

Whichever plan you are enrolled in, your retirement benefits are administered by the U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM).

Regardless of how many more years you may work before retirement, it's a good idea to understand all the benefits you earn and to plan early.

For complete information about the CSRS and FERS, visit OPM's Federal Retirement Programs Web site, www.opm.gov/retire/index.asp, or visit your USPS personnel office.


Jan 06, 2015

Medicare Enrollment

General enrollment in Medicare is open from Jan. 1 through March 31, but don’t confuse the general enrollment period with your eligibility enrollment period: You are eligible to enroll in Medicare three months before you turn 65, the month of your 65th birthday, and three months after the month you turn 65.

You will be penalized if you enroll outside of your eligibility period and your options to enroll will be limited.

If you miss your eligibility window, you may sign up only during the general enrollment period at the beginning of the year, with few exceptions. And, if Social Security records reflect that you have enrolled late, you will be required to pay a penalty in addition to the monthly premium. The penalty for enrolling late is 10 percent for each year you delay enrollment in Medicare Part B.

For most USPS retirees, the premium for Medicare Part B for 2015 is $104.90. Medicare B covers medically-necessary services from doctors and other health care providers, ambulance services, outpatient care, home health care, and some preventative services. For a complete list of covered services, visit www.Medicare.gov.

Medicare Part A covers hospitalization and it’s free because you paid for it while you worked for the Postal Service. You are eligible for Medicare Part A if you are over 65, under 65 with certain disabilities, or currently receiving Social Security benefits. If you are covered by the Federal Employees Health Benefits Plan (FEHBP) you will not be penalized if you sign-up for Medicare Part A after age 65.

The questions asked most frequently about Medicare are:

How do I enroll? - You can sign up for Medicare by visiting your local Social Security office or by completing an online application at www.socialsecurity.gov. You may also call to request an appointment to enroll by phone by calling 1-800-772-1213; TTY/TDD: 1-877-486-2048.

How do I make the payment for Medicare Part B? - There is a range of options for paying Medicare premiums. You may pay by automatic bill payment through your bank account (also known as Medicare Easy Pay), by check, or the payments may be withheld from your Social Security or annuity benefit. Be clear with Social Security on the payment method you select to avoid a delay in processing your first payments.

Should I keep my Federal Employee Health Benefits Plan and enroll in Medicare Parts A and B as well? - That’s a personal decision; when weighing your options, you should consider your usage of medical services, your ability to pay, and the penalty for enrolling late in Medicare Part B. When you retain your FEHB Plan and enroll in Medicare A and B, Medicare will be your primary payer and your FEHB Plan will cover most of the difference. APWU retirees who are in the APWU Health Plan have expressed appreciation for having both Medicare and our health plan. If you have a FEHB plan other than APWU, you should contact your FEHB plan for advice.

When does Medicare take effect? The date coverage begins depends on when you enrolled. If you enrolled during your 65th birthday enrollment period, coverage starts the first day of your birth month, unless your birthday is on the first day of the month; if your birthday is on the first day of the month, the coverage starts on the prior month. If you enrolled the month after your 65th, there is a delay of one month for each month you delay in getting coverage after turning 65. For example, if you wait one month after your birth month to sign up, coverage will start two months after you sign up. Finally, if you sign up during the general enrollment period, coverage starts on July 1 of that year.

For more information about Medicare, call 1-800-772-1213 or visit www.Medicare.gov.


Jan 08, 2014
APWU

About the APWU Retirees Department

The APWU Retirees Department is the voice of retired APWU members — within the union and on Capitol Hill.

Retirees helped build the union as we fought for — and won — better wages, improved benefits, and the right to be treated with dignity and respect.

Now, the union fights for retirees as Congress makes budget and policy decisions that affect our pensions and healthcare coverage, and that impact our lives in a profound way. The Retirees Department seeks to organize retired APWU members to join in these struggles.

The department also provides members with opportunities to see old friends — and make new ones— by participating in the activities of APWU Retiree Chapters and other union events.

The APWU Retirees Department was established in 1992 by delegates to the union’s 11th Biennial National Convention. Our goal was to bring retirees back into the union family while advancing the objectives of retired and active union members. The creation of the department required the passage of an amendment to the APWU Constitution and Bylaws, approved by more than two-thirds of voting delegates.

At subsequent conventions, delegates amended the constitution to strengthen the voice of retirees in union affairs, voting to allow retirees to elect five regional Retirees National Convention Delegates; to improve funding of retiree chapters, and to allow members of the APWU Retirees Department to elect the department director, beginning with the 2007 election of national officers.

Currently, there are more than 80,000 APWU Retirees Department members, 39local Retiree chapters, and four state chapters.


Jul 07, 2011
.
Jul 07, 2011
Retirement Annuity Calculation Use one of the worksheets below to develop an estimation of your retirement annuity.


Page Last Updated: Aug 21, 2017 (08:42:54)
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