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Feb 20, 2017
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Feb 22, 2017
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Mar 16, 2017
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Mar 17, 2017
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Mar 25, 2017
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Retiree Corner
2017 COLA's
Feb 16, 2017

For CSRS Retirees:

The 2018 CSRS retiree COLA is based on the third quarter (July, August, September) average CPI-W index (1982-84=100) in 2017 over the 2016 third quarter average. After the fourth quarter of 2016, the first quarter for the 2018 COLA adjustment period, the quarterly average has risen slightly by 0.2%.

CSRS COLA

CSRS COLA

1995

2.8%

2008

2.3%

1996

2.6%

2009

5.8%

1997

2.9%

2010

0%

1998

2.1%

2011

0%

1999

1.3%

2012

3.6%

2000

2.4%

2013

1.7%

2001

3.5%

2014

1.5%

2002

2.6%

2015

1.7%

2003

1.4%

2016

0%

2004

2.1%

2017

0.3%

2005

2.7%

2018

2006

4.1%

2007

3.3%


For FERS Retirees:

The 2018 FERS retiree COLA is based on the third quarter (July, August, September) average CPI-W index (1982-84=100) in 2017 over the 2016 third quarter average. However, if the CPI-W quarterly average increases 3% or more, they subtract 1%. A 5% increase in the quarterly CPI-W average results in a 4% adjustment. If the quarterly average increases from 2% to 3%, benefits increase by 2%. A CPI-W quarterly average increase of 2% or less will increase benefits by the change in the CPI-W quarterly average. After the fourth quarter of 2016, the first quarter for the 2018 COLA adjustment period, the quarterly average has risen slightly by 0.2%.

FERS COLA

FERS COLA

 1995

2.0%

2008

2.0%

1996

2.0%

2009

4.8%

1997

2.0%

2010

0.0%

1998

2.0%

2011

0.0%

1999

1.3%

2012

2.6%

2000

2.0%

2013

1.7%

2001

2.5%

2014

1.5%

2002

2.0%

2015

1.7%

2003

1.4%

2016

0%

2004

2.0%

2017

0.3%

2005

2.0%

2018

2006

3.1%

2007

2.3%


For Social Security Recipients:

The 2018 Social Security COLA is based on the third quarter (July, August, September) average CPI-W index (1982-84=100) in 2017 over the 2016 third quarter average. After the fourth quarter of 2016, the first quarter for the 2018 COLA adjustment period, the quarterly average has risen slightly by 0.2%.

Social Security

Social Security

1995

2.8%

2008

2.3%

1996

2.6%

2009

5.8%

1997

2.9%

2010

0.0%

1998

2.1%

2011

0.0%

1999

1.3%

2012

3.6%

2000

2.4%

2013

1.7%

2001

3.5%

2014

1.5%

2002

2.6%

2015

1.7%

2003

1.4%

2016

0%

2004

2.1%

2017

0.3%

2005

2.7%

2018

2006

4.1%

2007

3.3%


For FECA Employees:

The percentage increase in the December CPI-W (1982-84=100) index from year to year determines the FECA COLA increase.  After the first month of the 12-month measuring period for the 2018 FECA COLA the index rose 0.622%.

FECA COLA

1995

2.7%

2008

4.3%

1996

2.5%

2009

0.0%

1997

3.3%

2010

3.4%

1998

1.5%

2011

1.7%

1999

1.6%

2012

3.2%

2000

2.7%

2013

1.7%

2001

3.4%

2014

1.5%

2002

1.3%

2015

0.3%

2003

2.4%

2016

0.4%

2004

1.6%

2017

2.0%

2005

3.4%

2018

2006

3.5%

2007

2.4%


Fighting for Justice: Elder Financial Abuse
Jan 09, 2017

Fighting for Justice: Elder Financial Abuse

According to experts, financial fraud is the fastest growing form of elder abuse. “Financial elder abuse is when someone illegally or improperly uses a vulnerable senior’s money or other property,” explains Barbara Repa, legal writer and editor for Nolo.com. In many cases, the victim and his/her family does not know the crimes and/or abuse have occurred.

This is a personal issue for me. My aunt was a victim of financial abuse. The perpetrator entered her home and stole her passport, financial and personal records. He opened internet accounts in her name, used her bank and credit cards, and changed the addresses on her utility bills. He kept a notebook that listed her family members’ names, addresses and SSNs.

Our family did not find out about the theft until the police called to say they found her information and valuables with other neighbors’ burgled possessions. The police stated her passport and utility bills were valuable in order to steal her identity.

Identify Elder Financial Abuse

To protect yourself or your loved ones from elder financial abuse you must learn what it looks like, ways to prevent it and what to do if you suspect that you or a family member are targeted.

Seniors who live alone, or with another senior, can become targets. Perpetrators could be anyone from strangers, to family members, friends, acquaintances or neighbors.

How do you know if a senior in your life is vulnerable to financial abuse? The following factors increase the chances of being victimized, says The National Committee for the Prevention of Elder Abuse (NCPEA):

  • Isolation,
  • Loneliness,
  • Recent Loss,
  • Physical or mental disabilities,
  • Lack of familiarity with financial matters,
  • Have a family member(s) who are unemployed and/or have substance abuse problems.

Start by protecting and securing any mail or documents containing your personal identifying information, for example, your passport, Social Security card, birth certificate, tax information, etc. Each month these documents should be stored away in a safe, out of sight, location.

Do not hide the documents from yourself! Make sure someone in your family knows your monthly routine for handling these documents. Also, use a shredder when you throw away mail or other documents containing personal identifying information. Even your recycling bin is not safe.

Warning Signs

Learn the warning signs of elder financial abuse in order to protect yourself or a loved one. Knowing the indicators can prevent abuse, but some can be explained by other causes, and no single clue is proof. Look for patterns suggesting a problem.

According to the NCPEA, indicators include:

  • Unpaid bills, eviction notices, or notices to discontinue utilities,
  • Unexplainable withdrawals from bank accounts or transfers between accounts,
  • Bank statements and canceled checks no longer come to the house,
  • New “best friends,”
  • Legal documents, such as power of attorney, and/or checks the senior does not remember signing,
  • The care of the senior is not commensurate with the size of his/her estate,
  • A caregiver expresses excessive interest in the amount of money being spent on the senior,
  • Belongings or property are missing,
  • Lack of documentation about financial arrangements,
  • Implausible explanations about the elderly person’s finances given by the senior or caregiver,
  • The senior is unaware of or does not understand the financial arrangements made for him/her.

If you think you or a loved one is a victim of elder financial abuse, do not hesitate to learn more. Visit the site www.preventelderabuse.org, to learn what steps you can take. 4

Resources: The National Committee for the Prevention of Elder Abuse (NCPEA), Forbes.com, and NOLO.com.


Paltry COLA Will Leave Postal, Federal Retirees Worse Off
Oct 25, 2016

Paltry COLA Will Leave Postal,

Federal Retirees Worse Off

APWU Working with Allies to Address Unintended Consequences
Web News Article #231-2016

10/20/2016 - The APWU has joined with 74 other organizations to urge Congress to correct an outrageous disparity, Retirees Department Director Nancy Olumekor reports.

Unless the legislature takes action, a miniscule 0.3 percent 2017 cost-of-living adjustment (COLA) for millions of retirees will result in a substantial reduction in the annuities of hundreds of thousands of postal and federal employees who are enrolled in Medicare.

The decrease is the result of the so-called “hold harmless” provision of Social Security law, explains Richard Thissen, president of the National Active and Retired Federal Employees Association (NARFE):

“Under the hold harmless provision of the Social Security Act, the dollar increase in Medicare Part B premiums is limited to the dollar increase in an individual’s Social Security benefit. With such a low COLA for Social Security benefits, about 70 percent of beneficiaries will be held harmless, meaning their Medicare Part B premiums will increase, on a dollar-to-dollar basis, only in proportion to the increase in their Social Security checks. The baseline premium for current beneficiaries held harmless is $104.90/month.

“However, the remaining 30 percent of Part B beneficiaries who are not held harmless, including federal retirees who are covered by the Civil Service Retirement System (CSRS) and who do not receive Social Security benefits, will shoulder the bulk of the cost of the 2017 premium increase. As projected by the Medicare Trustees, these individuals will see their premiums rise significantly. Without the effect of the hold harmless provision, there would be little to no increase in the standard Medicare premium.”

Thissen went on to say, “It is grossly unfair that those who pay their premiums from something other than Social Security must pay more in premiums. There is no reason why two people with the same income should pay different Medicare premiums based on whether the money is coming from a Social Security check or a federal annuity.”

The APWU has joined with NARFE and other allies to urge Congress to correct the discrepancy. In a Sept. 27 letter to House and Senate leaders, the organizations wrote:

“As it did in 2015, Congress should make it a priority to shield people with Medicare from the unintended consequences resulting from the application of the hold harmless provision. No beneficiary should be forced to pay more than they otherwise would simply because some beneficiaries are afforded critical protections against reductions in their Social Security checks. We urge Congress to act accordingly and swiftly following the announcement of the 2017 COLA. The longer Congress delays, the more uncertainty for our nation’s retirees, people with disabilities, and their families who are counting on you.”

In addition to the disparity facing postal and federal retirees, the tiny increase doesn’t reflect the increase in costs most retirees face. The COLA formula itself, the Consumer Price Index for Urban Wage Earners, CPI-W, “clearly does not reflect how seniors spend their money, particularly in light of recent Medicare premium increases,” Thissen noted. “The current measure, the CPI-W, fails to accurately reflect changes in consumer prices experienced by seniors, particularly those related to health care.”

Attachments

Letter to Congress re Retirees 2017 COLA 092716 (70.21 KB)


COLA Projection for 2017?
Oct 03, 2016

COLA Projection for 2017?

(This article first appeared in the September-October 2016 issue of The American Postal Worker magazine.)

As we go to press it is too early to know if retirees will receive a cost-of-living adjustment (COLA) increase in 2017.

The Social Security Board of Trustees will announce the 2017 COLA in October, and an update will be posted at apwu.org as soon as possible after the announcement is made. Current projections range from no adjustment to 0.2 percent increase.

According to many experts, increases in retirees’ cost of living are understated. That’s because COLAs are based on CPI-W, the Consumer Price Index for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers, which measures the spending of families who make most of their income from wage earners. It excludes families whose main sources of income are pensions and Social Security.

Retirees have different spending habits than people who are still working. Most notably, they tend to spend more on health care, where costs generally increase much faster than the overall inflation rate. That’s why the APWU has fought along with the Alliance for Retired Americans and others to change the formula for retiree COLAs from the CPI-W to the CPI-E (Consumer Price Index for the Elderly).

Medicare Integration

A House committee approved the Postal Service Reform Act of 2016 (H.R. 5714) in July. The bill addresses the pre-funding requirement of the Postal Accountability and Enhancement Act of 2006 (PAEA), which has virtually destroyed USPS finances, through “Medicare Integration.” President Dimondstein shared his opinion of the bill, as well as what needs to be changed in order for APWU to support it, during a conference call with the local and state retiree chapter leaders.

What’s good about the bill? Medicare Integration would establish a postal-specific health plan, which would remain part of the Federal Employees Health Benefits program (FEHB). Other good features are that the Medicare integration provision is part of comprehensive postal reform, not a stand-alone measure; the penalty for late enrollment in Medicare Part B would be waived; and a Medicare Education Program would be established. The union is monitoring the provisions to ensure there are no negative effects, especially as they relate to Medicare Part D.

There is much more to H.R. 5714 than Medicare Integration and reducing the Postal Service’s pre-funding obligations of the PAEA, however. The bill also would convert door delivery to curb-side delivery or cluster boxes, which would represent a major reduction in service. The legislation also fails to address needed changes in postage ratemaking.

New Union Contract

When President Dimondstein announced the details of our new Collective Bargaining Agreement (CBA) on July 8, many retirees asked, “What’s in it for me?”

Of course, the contractual changes in wages, cost-of-living adjustments and health insurance premiums don’t affect retirees, with one exception: Those who retired on or after Nov. 14, 2015, are entitled to retroactive pay for the period from Nov. 14, 2015, until the effective date of their retirement.

Other changes will benefit retirees. The Peak Season Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) permits the Postal Service to re-employ retirees for up to six weeks during the holiday season, without any adverse impact on their annuity. These re-employed workers will be paid at the current hourly rate of Level 6 Postal Support Employees, $16.06 per hour.

Another contractual improvement that will benefit some retirees addresses collection procedures for post-separation Letters of Indebtedness. The new provision requires management to advise employees of their right to file a grievance within 14 days of receipt of the Letter of Indebtedness or petition through the Debt Collection Act. It also stipulates that if a timely grievance or petition is filed, management must delay collection of the debt until the matter is adjudicated.

Election 2016

Sisters and brothers, this bears repeating until everyone does their part: On Nov. 8, 2016, we must show up and make sure that Hillary Clinton is elected President of the United States. We can’t just stop with Hillary, we must also elect officials up and down the ballot who will address and support issues of importance to retirees and our families


Vote in Election of National Union Officers
Sep 12, 2016

Ballots Mailed Sept. 10 to Sept. 15

Vote in Election of National Union Officers

APWU NSB 14-2016 (934.05 KB)

09/09/2016 - Ballots for the 2016 Election of APWU National Officers will be mailed to members’ homes Saturday, Sept. 10, to Thursday, Sept. 15. All members “in good standing” as of June 24, 2016, will receive a ballot.

To be counted, ballots must be returned to and received  in the designated post office box in Washington, DC, by 2 p.m. on Wednesday, Oct. 5.

Union members are encouraged to follow the balloting instructions carefully. 

Members in good standing who have not received their ballots by Monday, Sept. 19, should notify their local or contact the American Arbitration Association between the hours of 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. (Eastern Time) at 800-529-5218 to request a duplicate. Ballots may also be requested by visiting www.aaaelections.org/apwu.

All requests for duplicate ballots must include the member’s name, address, employee ID number (or retiree ID number), the last four digits of the Social Security number, division (craft), and local.

The APWU National Election Committee will take custody of the ballots from the designated post office box at 2 p.m. on Wednesday, Oct. 5. Votes will be tallied at the Kellogg Conference Center at Gallaudet University, 800 Florida Avenue NE, Washington DC 20002. 

Unofficial election results will be posted on the union’s website, www.apwu.org, as soon as they are available, and will be updated frequently. Official results will be posted as soon as they are available as well.

For more information, visit apwu.org.


Incentives Offered to Locals, Retiree Chapters to Get Out Vote

The APWU is urging union members to vote in this year’s election of national union officers. To encourage participation, the union is sponsoring a competition that will reward locals and retiree chapters whose members vote in the highest percentages. 

Ballots are being mailed to all eligible APWU members Sept. 10-15, and must be returned to and received in the designated post office box by 2 p.m. on Oct. 5.
 
The incentive for participation in the election process will be payments to the locals and retiree chapters to be used on behalf of the membership. The top three locals in each size category will receive cash awards based on the number of members: 

  •     1,000 and above: $4,000
  •      500-999: $2,000
  •     100-499:  $1,000
  •      1-99:  $200

The top three retiree chapters also will receive awards: 

  • 500-999: $500
  • 100-499: $250
  • 1-99: $50

To be eligible, locals and retiree chapters must reach a voter participation level of at least 50 percent. If more than three in any category generate 100 percent participation, all “100%” locals and chapters will receive awards. 

Attachments
NSB 14-2016 (934.05 KB)

Applications for Holiday Temp Jobs Due Sept. 11
Sep 07, 2016

Attention Retirees:

Applications for Holiday Temp Jobs Due Sept. 11

Web News Article #202-2016

09/01/2016 - Time is running short for APWU retirees who are interested in applying for temporary positions as Holiday Clerk Assistants: Applications are due Sept. 11.

The Peak Season Exception Periods memo signed by President Mark Dimondstein and the USPS Vice President of Labor Relations in September 2015 has been carried forward into the new contract.  Therefore, retirees will have the opportunity to be rehired as temporary Holiday Clerk Assistants again this year – this time in both Mail Processing and Customer Service.

If a retiree takes advantage of this opportunity, it will have no adverse impact on his or her annuity.    

Those interested in working temporarily as a Holiday Clerk Assistant, must apply online at www.usps.com/employment. To apply, click on the “Search Now” button, type “Annuitant” in the space next to “Keywords,” and then click “Start.”

  • Applications are being accepted until Sept. 11, 2016. 
  • The pay is set at $16.06 per hour (the same hourly rate as Grade 6 Postal Support Employees).
  • The appointment is limited to a six-week period from Nov. 12 through Dec. 23, 2016, or Nov. 26, 2016, through Jan. 6, 2017.                                                                                       

“This represents an important opportunity for our retired members to put their postal experience to good use while they earn a little extra cash,” Dimondstein said. “I encourage all interested retirees to complete their applications as soon as possible.” 


APWU Retirees: Still Fighting for Justice!
Aug 31, 2016

APWU Retirees: Still Fighting for Justice!

Web News Article #194-2016

08/31/2016 - APWU retirees no longer work in the post office, but they are still a fighting force in the union and their communities. Delegates from around the country who attended the Retiree Conference held in conjunction with the 23rd Biennial APWU National Convention made that crystal clear. 

Byron Denton

Western Region Delegate Byron Denton noted that at the first APWU National Convention in 1971, there were only five retiree delegates. "We have grown so much," he said. "We are going to fight like heck for what’s ours!"

The 88-year-old member of the Sacramento Area Local was one of two delegates given special recognition. Denton, who has been a delegate for his region since the position’s inception, said that this would be his last convention serving in this capacity.

"I am very deeply honored. I felt I wouldn’t make it here, but I did," Denton said. "I love all of you and depend on you to keep up the good work!"

Nancy Olumekor

David Bernstein, president of the Florida Postal Workers Retiree Chapter, was given a special video tribute to his 60 years of union activism.

Like active members, the new Collective Bargaining Agreement (CBA) was on everyone’s mind. "So many of you have emailed me asking, ‘What’s in the contract for us?’" Retiree Director Nancy Olumekor said. "The CBA is generally negotiated for active members working every day. ... But the union has taken steps forward to expand its ability to negotiate benefits for retirees."

Some of those benefits include the Peak Holiday Season Memorandum of Understanding, which allows annuitants to work up to six weeks as Holiday Clerk Assistants without affecting their retiree benefits.

Retirees are still mobilizing and organizing. President Mark Dimondstein saluted their "tremendous spirit of activism," especially in the Stop Staples campaign.

"By the way, we are winning. We haven’t won yet, but we are on the road," Dimondstein said of the campaign to drive Staples out of the postal business. Retirees are also busy fighting on behalf of the Campaign for Postal Banking, opposing the Trans-Pacific Partnership, donating money to COPA, and working to turn out the vote this November.


APWU 2016 National Convention from a Retiree’s Perspective
Aug 30, 2016

APWU 2016 National Convention

from a Retiree’s Perspective

by Scott Morrow, DMAL Retiree Chapter President

The Denver Metro Retiree Chapter drafted me to attend the APWU Convention as an observer only, no voice and no votes.  Our Chapter has a couple of full dues paying members out of around 200 who could run for delegate.  Delegates have a voice and a vote.

Each Region provides for a single elected Retiree delegate elected to a three-year term by the retirees paying $36 each year in dues.  We vote for the Western Region Retiree Delegate who is currently Byron Denton from Northern California.  I met with Brother Denton, who has served the APWU membership for decades.  At age 88, this will be his last convention. 

ARTICLE 5 of the APWU Constitution outlines the convention procedures.  My favorite part of this article is section 7:

SEC. 7. All delegates in attendance at national, regional, or state conventions shall be required to wear clothing and other articles insofar as possible, bearing the union label.

All my Union shirts are made in the USA by Union workers while my jeans, socks and jeans shorts were made in the USA.  My New Balance union made in the USA shoes are too worn out for wearing as an observer for my Retiree Chapter. 

Retiree Conference Saturday and Sunday

A complimentary breakfast from 5:30 AM to 6:45 AM Mountain time was available both Saturday and Sunday of the conference.  The workers setting up the banquet were Union members!  The first morning there was no fruit, so I mentioned it to one the Union Brothers and the next day we had lots of fruit. J

I touched base with  Byron Denton (who received an award for over three decades as Western Area Retiree delegate), Bobby Donnelson, President of the Southwest CA Retiree Chapter,  Dr. Pat Williams, Candidate for Byron’s spot, National Officers and Shirley Taylor, my clerk NBA when I was in Reno, NV.

Phil Gardner of OPM made the best presentation of the day.  Most important, we can change our FEHB enrollment at any time if it is a decrease or from self and one or family to self only.  I spent some time at the icebreaker getting his contact info and developing rapport in case we need issues resolved.  OPM, like social security and Medicare, have had their budgets slashed by the Republican Majorities in Congress, over and again making it nearly impossible for them to meet demand.   Therefore, OPM has given us complete access to our accounts at www.servicesonline.opm.gov.

  

Rich Fiesta, the author of the Alliance Reports I receive and repost on the Chapter Face Book page made a great presentation.  He covered much of what Judy Beard did, immediately following his presentation as the Alliance is a legislative organization chartered by the AFL-CIO in 2001, who works closely with NARFE or the National Association of Retired Federal Employees. 

Judy Beard covered both legislative issues and retiree chapter topics.  The previous CBA included language to afford retirees the right to grieve any USPSBS collection demands and the latest CBA requires notice to retirees of this right.  We also now have a contractual right to apply for temporary USPS work during the Christmas rush period and those hired receive $16.06 hourly with zero consequences for your retirement. 

There was a social security presentation that couldn’t hold a candle to the one we had at our meeting on two occasions by John.  The Health Plan Director was there and did a short presentation and answered questions.

I snatched up any/all available information to add to the small satchel of information provided at the beginning.  Included were the resolutions , which we debated on Sunday.

Resolutions affecting you were prioritized by the five elected National Convention Retiree Delegates as follows:

1.     Article 3 of the APWU Constitution, Resolution 4 would increase the associate health plan dues from $35 to $40.  The conference adopted this resolution due to the impossible situation we face when the health plan puts APWU retires in as associate members in lieu of chapter members.  We are losing hundreds of dollars in our budget every year due to this fiasco. 

2.     Article 11, Section 2 (1), Resolution 12:  Require APWU to pay expenses for our five delegates to attend the conventions and retiree conferences.  The conference adopted the resolution because President Burris had refused to pay their expenses.

3.      Article 13, Section 1, Paragraph 4, Resolution 13 places the Retirees Director on the National Executive Board with voice and vote.  The conference adopted, for obvious reasons.  We built the Union and should have a voice on the highest governing body.

4.     Article 6, Resolution 5 would require APWU to give delegate status to one Retiree Chapter delegate for each 100 members thereof.  The conference adopted this because we need a voice and vote at conventions.  Retiree membership is exponentially increasing while union membership of workers continues to decrease.

Most of these resolutions have been submitted at two or more previous conventions and have failed to pass. Tomorrow the convention starts on the Constitution and CBA resolution determination process.

The first two days of the convention started out with a Denver Region caucus at 6:00 AM Mountain Time.  I was provided time Tuesday morning to go over the Retiree’s top four resolutions.  For the most part the delegation was supportive.  The biggest issue was that the entire delegation, except two of us, paid full dues and we pay $36 annually.  My take on their position was that I needed to pay a poll tax of $648 annually (current Denver Metro Local Dues) to have a vote.  Under the DMAL constitution that would also require me to run in an election for the general spot and win.

The convention always started at 7:30 AM Mountain Time with interesting speakers.  My favorites were Nina Turner, Jim Hightower, Keith Ellison, Ed Schultz, DR Mona Hanna-Attish and the Presidents of the Carriers and Mail handlers. All but a handful of the resolutions discussed over the four days had zero bearing on my constituency.  The Retiree Resolutions supported by the Denver Region Caucus and the Retiree Conference all went up in smoke except for one. 

Article 11, Section 2   (1), Resolution 12 that required APWU to pay expenses for our five delegates to attend the conventions and retiree conferences obtained the two thirds majority necessary to pass! 

I am recommending to any Retiree Chapter that until we achieve voting status on the convention floor, it is best to send a representative to the conference only and save all the other expenses.   I must admit the DMAL was supportive in every way.  President Kirby invited me to a great dinner that helped us bond, and it was really good and lots of fun.

The Denver Region was also supportive and gave me a voice at morning caucuses. 

Being invited to the caucuses actually makes it worthwhile to hang around the first two days of the convention, if affordable.  Rest assured, the Retiree Caucus will be bringing forth the resolutions yet again in 2018!

/rb

opeiu #30

afl-cio


Right-Sizing Your Health Insurance
May 12, 2016

Right-Sizing Your Health Insurance

(This article first appeared in the May-June 2016 issue of The American Postal Worker magazine.)

Retirees frequently search for ways to cut expenses. Recently, many have asked if you can still switch your coverage under the Federal Employees Health Benefits Program (FEHB) from Self and Family to Self Plus One.

Although active-duty employees are only allowed to make changes during Open Season (except when they experience a life-changing event), federal and postal retirees may decrease their health insurance enrollment at any time.

Self Plus One enrollment allows participants to get coverage for themselves and one other eligible family member.

For many retirees, it’s worth considering. First, find out if your current plan offers Self Plus One coverage. Good news for those in the APWU Health Plan! It offers Self Plus One coverage. If you are currently covering yourself and your spouse only, you may want to look into enrolling in Self Plus One.

To make changes to your FEHB health insurance, call 1-888-767-7638 or write to US OPM Retirement Programs, Attn: Request Self Plus One, 1900 E Street NW, Washington DC 20415-3532. 


Photo contest winner Maryann Medina of California with fellow
retirees participating in a Stop Staples demonstration.

Older Americans Month Contest Winners

The APWU Retirees Department appreciates the many submissions to the photo and essay contest.

Essay contest winner retiree member Regina Favors of Michigan wrote about the importance of civic participation and protecting our benefits in retirement.

“In the upcoming Nov. 8, 2016, election, retirees will be voting on issues such as the protection of Medicare and Social Security,” she wrote. “We must elect federal and state representatives who will make sure seniors are cared for. We are not afraid of the word socialism, because we know it stands for a federal economic system, which is how Social Security and Medicare is currently administered. Privatizing these programs will more than likely down grade the services and turn them into profit makers for rich investors. It will also deprive many seniors of their earned benefits.”


Fighting for Justice: Elder Financial Abuse
Feb 14, 2017

Fighting for Justice: Elder Financial Abuse

(This article first appeared in the January-February 2017 issue of The American Postal Worker magazine.)

According to experts, financial fraud is the fastest growing form of elder abuse. “Financial elder abuse is when someone illegally or improperly uses a vulnerable senior’s money or other property,” explains Barbara Repa, legal writer and editor for Nolo.com. In many cases, the victim and his/her family does not know the crimes and/or abuse have occurred.

This is a personal issue for me. My aunt was a victim of financial abuse. The perpetrator entered her home and stole her passport, financial and personal records. He opened internet accounts in her name, used her bank and credit cards, and changed the addresses on her utility bills. He kept a notebook that listed her family members’ names, addresses and SSNs.

Our family did not find out about the theft until the police called to say they found her information and valuables with other neighbors’ burgled possessions. The police stated her passport and utility bills were valuable in order to steal her identity.

Identify Elder Financial Abuse

To protect yourself or your loved ones from elder financial abuse you must learn what it looks like, ways to prevent it and what to do if you suspect that you or a family member are targeted.

Seniors who live alone, or with another senior, can become targets. Perpetrators could be anyone from strangers, to family members, friends, acquaintances or neighbors.

How do you know if a senior in your life is vulnerable to financial abuse? The following factors increase the chances of being victimized, says The National Committee for the Prevention of Elder Abuse (NCPEA):

  • Isolation,
  • Loneliness,
  • Recent Loss,
  • Physical or mental disabilities,
  • Lack of familiarity with financial matters,
  • Have a family member(s) who are unemployed and/or have substance abuse problems.

Start by protecting and securing any mail or documents containing your personal identifying information, for example, your passport, Social Security card, birth certificate, tax information, etc. Each month these documents should be stored away in a safe, out of sight, location.

Do not hide the documents from yourself! Make sure someone in your family knows your monthly routine for handling these documents. Also, use a shredder when you throw away mail or other documents containing personal identifying information. Even your recycling bin is not safe.

Warning Signs

Learn the warning signs of elder financial abuse in order to protect yourself or a loved one. Knowing the indicators can prevent abuse, but some can be explained by other causes, and no single clue is proof. Look for patterns suggesting a problem.

According to the NCPEA, indicators include:

  • Unpaid bills, eviction notices, or notices to discontinue utilities,
  • Unexplainable withdrawals from bank accounts or transfers between accounts,
  • Bank statements and canceled checks no longer come to the house,
  • New “best friends,”
  • Legal documents, such as power of attorney, and/or checks the senior does not remember signing,
  • The care of the senior is not commensurate with the size of his/her estate,
  • A caregiver expresses excessive interest in the amount of money being spent on the senior,
  • Belongings or property are missing,
  • Lack of documentation about financial arrangements,
  • Implausible explanations about the elderly person’s finances given by the senior or caregiver,
  • The senior is unaware of or does not understand the financial arrangements made for him/her.

If you think you or a loved one is a victim of elder financial abuse, do not hesitate to learn more. Visit the site www.preventelderabuse.org, to learn what steps you can take. 4

Resources: The National Committee for the Prevention of Elder Abuse (NCPEA), Forbes.com, and NOLO.com.


No COLA Triggers Some Medicare Increases
Jan 05, 2016

No COLA Triggers Some Medicare Increases

As we predicted, there will be no cost-of-living adjustment (COLA) increase for Social Security recipients and federal retirees in 2016. As a result, if you are a federal retiree enrolled in Medicare Part B and you make your premium payments by any method other than through your Social Security check, or if you are a new enrollee to Medicare benefits, your premium payment for 2016 will be $120.70.

The increase could have been much higher, however. President Barack Obama and congressional leaders softened the blow by setting a cap in the two-year budget deal, which prevented the increase from escalating to $159.30. In addition, for the next five years, there will also be a $3 surcharge for those affected by the premium increase.

Will retirees who are currently paying their Medicare Part B premiums through Social Security be required to pay more in 2016?

No. The “hold harmless” provision of the Social Security Act prevents the government from reducing payments to recipients who pay their Medicare Part B premiums from their Social Security checks simply because there was no COLA increase by preventing a hike in the premiums for Medicare Part B. The premiums will remain at $104.90 for those covered by the “hold harmless” provision.


SHAFTA Unveiled
Nov 09, 2015

SHAFTA Unveiled

by Scott Morrow, President DMAL Retiree Chapter

            I have been working hard at sounding the warning sirens over SHAFTA (Southern Hemisphere Asian Free Trade Agreement) aka TPP or Trans Pacific Partnership for many months.  This treaty dressed in the charade of a trade agreement has been negotiated in secret by about 500 of the most affluent monopolies worldwide with no input from Unions, Retirees or any other stakeholders.  If passed, SHAFTA will encompass 40% of the entire global economies’. 

            SHAFTA contains 30 chapters (four on actual trade) enumerating 1939 pages plus 17 “side” documents.  The shortest chapters (four or less pages) are small business, regulatory coherence, transparency and corruption.  While the USA Trade Department has the agreement posted I found their site to be cumbersome and very unreliable to link to.  My source is the New Zealand Site since they posted before anyone else: http://tpp.mfat.govt.nz/text

            Obviously as I write there was hardly time to review 1939 pages of legalese much less digest them.   I was concerned about losing millions more of good American Jobs and the final destruction of our Union Movement so I started with Chapter 19; Labour.  It will be insurmountable for Union workers here to compete with the 65 cents an hour minimum wage in Vietnam but impossible to compete with the sanctioned slave labor in Malaysia.  It was appalling to see that this slave labor trade can continue under SHAFTA as slave labor will be “discouraged” (but not prohibited) by the treaty members. 

            Most alarming for me as the President of the only APWU Retiree Chapter chartered in Colorado was the fact that if SHAFTA passes, it will be at least 25 years before our members will be able to access less expensive generic equivalent new life saving drugs.  American Retirees’ already face the highest medicine prescription costs in the world, many marked up 10,000% to enrich the drug monopolies.  SHAFTA makes this even worse, makes drugs more expensive and for longer periods.  The nuts and bolts can be reviewed in the longest SHAFTA Chapter, 18, INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY.  It is 74 pages long with only one purpose.  To insure the largest possible profits for the economic royalists at the expense of the working and retired classes.  Patent extensions on drugs alone will result in an untold number of premature deaths should SHAFTA pass.

            The Campaign for America’s Future summed SHAFTA up this way, “It means drug companies will be able to extend their monopoly pricing over new, life-saving drugs, often built on research paid for by taxpayers through the National Institutes of Health.

New cancer treatments, vaccines and even a cure for HIV could be put out of reach to all but the affluent because this trade deal would allow the pharmaceutical companies to price them for profit, not for people – and keep competing generic drugs off the market longer.

It gets worse. Foreign banks will have the ability to challenge and even overturn our financial regulations. The TPP will send jobs overseas, push wages down, weaken unions and make it harder to protect our environment.”

            SHAFTA WILL negatively affect every person reading this article!  If you have been sitting on the sidelines or for those who regularly contact your Senators and House Representative, now is the time to make contact at least every week.  This is not a sporting event or a game; this is our future and the future of our children and grandchildren.  For those I represent, it may represent the difference between life and death. 

            We have 90 days or less to convince Congress to vote NO on SHAFTA.  Let us get started right now and keep the heat on right up until February of 2016.  We cannot kill SHAFTA without you.


New Medicare Legislation
Jun 22, 2015
New Medicare Legislation

APWU members at the San Francisco Retiree's Luncheon on May 19.

(This article first appeared in the July-August 2015 issue of The American Postal Worker magazine.)

The Improving Access to Medicare Coverage Act of 2015 (H.R. 1571) addresses many of our concerns regarding out-of-pocket expenses for nursing facility care once an individual is released from a hospital and the hospital has coded the stay as “observation status.” This bipartisan bill was introduced in Congress on March 24.

Medicare currently covers care in skilled nursing facilities when in-patient hospital care lasts for at least three days. However, when a hospital codes the stay as “observation status” it doesn’t fall under the in-patient rule, so the patient doesn’t qualify for Medicare coverage for a stay in a skilled nursing facility once he or she is released from the hospital.

H.R. 1571 “amends Title XVIII of the Social Security Act to count the period of observation services in a hospital toward satisfying the three-day in-patient hospital stay requirement for coverage of skilled nursing facilities services under Medicare.”

This bill was introduced by Rep. Joe Courtney (D-CT), Rep. Chellie Pingree (D-ME), Rep. Niki Tsongas (D-MA), Rep. Mark Takano (D-CA), Rep. Grace Meng (D-NY), Rep. Peter DeFazio (D-OR), Rep. Michelle Lujan Grisham (D-NM), Rep. John Larson (D-CT), Rep. Lloyd Doggett (D-TX), Rep. Bill Bascrell (D-NJ), Rep. Lois Frankel (D-FL), Rep. Rosa DeLauro (D-CT), Rep. William Keating (D-MA), Rep. Katherine Clark (D-MA), Rep. Earl Blumenauer (D-OR), Rep. Robert Wittman (R-VA), Rep. Richard Hanna (R-NY), Rep. Christopher Gibson (R-NY), Rep. Kurt Schrader (D-OR), Rep. Susan DelBene (D-WA), and Rep. Brian Higgins (D-NY).

H.R. 1571 has been referred to the Ways and Means Committee. I urge you to ask your congressional representative to co-sponsor this bill. It could help many seniors financially.


Sometimes It Hurts To Be Right
Jan 28, 2015

Sometimes It Hurts To Be Right

by Scott Morrow, President DMAL Retiree Chapter

          I take very little pleasure in accurately forecasting what we are in store for from the Republican majority in Congress.  For those who read my article in the last edition of the voice, titled Elections Have Consequences, you know my outlook was a bit dreary.

          Writing this article just a couple days after the Republican’s took control of Congress it is clear an all-out assault on the poor, the middle class, Unions and our

environment was the top priority of those folks.  This is a surprise for those who miss their opportunities to pay attention to the agenda.  This party has been for the rich and the monopolies since President Eisenhower finished his term.

          First, the rules have been changed in the House regarding economic impacts of legislation.  Our High School Civics class taught us that ALL spending must start in the House.  In past years, the Congressional Budget Office or CBO, a nonpartisan agency, would determine the cost of legislation many times before a vote was taken.  Now, under the new rules passed, dynamic scoring will be used.  This is the “voodoo” economics theory we saw originally instituted during Reagan where by giving hundreds of billions in tax breaks for the rich and monopolies, that money will ‘trickle down”.  Over three decades of history have shown us this did not work and will NOT work for retirees, or anyone else except the affluent.

          Also introduced on the first day of the new Congress was a rule to prevent  what was a routine transfer of social security trust fund cash to the disability fund to ensure payments to disabled Americans.  Many estimate that nearly eleven million SSDI recipients will experience reductions of around 20% in their social security payments.  Millions more will be cut off from the program entirely.

          Added into the omnibus bill right before the last Congress adjourned were massive cuts to pensions of Union members.  Many companies with Union Workers pooled the pension funds into shared funds.  These funds were hit hard by losses due to the banksters crash of the world economy in 2008.  Due to thepassage of the continuing funding of the US budget last month, all those folks receiving pensions or getting near retirement will see drastic cuts to their annuities of up to 50% to balance the pension books.

          The top legislative agenda for both the House and Senate is to bypass current protocol’s for the Keystone XL pipeline.  While the President at this time has promised a veto, this is a disaster for retirees health and property.  Under current law, a foreign company will take property it wants (called eminent domain) to build the pipeline to move the dirtiest oil on the planet through the USA to refineries on the gulf coast for export to foreign countries.  Gas prices will increase in the USA.  Materials for the pipeline will be foreign.  Retirees will get the oil spills, the deadly pollution and increased health care costs while foreigners enrich themselves at our expense.  All for about 30 permanent full time jobs.

          Combine this with the dynamic scoring that will result in huge deficits like it did when Reagan tripled the National Debt, causing screaming from the highest rooftops about debt once a democrat got into office with cuts in pensions and social security already passed and we are in serious trouble.

          Currently in committee already are bills to end Obama Care (PPACA), restrict abortion, cut SNAP and TANF, tax cuts to the wealthy and monopolies, etc.  The same old legislation we saw in the last two Congresses to finalize our transformation into a full blown oligarchy.

          What can we do?  First we need to take back our democracy before it is too late, get out the vote, support a constitutional amendment to overturn Citizens United (Supreme Court Decision that legalized limitless cash bribery of elected Representatives in the form of contributions) and get involved with your Union and Retiree Chapter Legislative Departments.   Educate yourself on what is going on.   If you have cable or satellite, watch CPAN.  Use non-monopoly media for your news.  PBS, Link TV and Free Speech TV are examples of viewer supported stations that actually practice journalism.  Come to your meetings and read all the publications you receive.  The APWU monthly periodical has articles on the key issues facing Unions by our Legislative Officers, every edition! 

          While your social security is already directly affected after just the first day of the 114th Congress, your FERS or CSRS retirement will be next.  The time has come for you to actively join the struggle.  Think of it this way, there are about 400billionaires and like number of monopolies who have bought Congress.  There are at least 200 million of us getting poorer every day.  Certainly, once we all join the moral cause to protect the least among us and keep what we have earned after decades of working towards our retirement we will far outnumber the few with all the cash.  You have to like those odds, 200 million against the paltry, yet greedy, 800? 

After all, it is only together that we can overcome.


Postal Retirement Benefits
Jan 07, 2015

Postal Retirement Benefits

The APWU and other federal unions have worked with Congress for many decades to ensure retirement income security for employees who spend their careers in government service.

Today, most postal employees are eligible to participate in one of two federal retirement benefit programs:

The Civil Service Retirement System (CSRS), which provides benefits for most workers hired before 1984.

The Federal Employee Retirement System (FERS), which covers all workers hired after 1984.

Though FERS pays a smaller monthly benefit than CSRS, FERS retirees also receive Social Security and Thrift Savings Plan payments.

Whichever plan you are enrolled in, your retirement benefits are administered by the U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM).

Regardless of how many more years you may work before retirement, it's a good idea to understand all the benefits you earn and to plan early.

For complete information about the CSRS and FERS, visit OPM's Federal Retirement Programs Web site, www.opm.gov/retire/index.asp, or visit your USPS personnel office.


Medicare Enrollment
Jan 06, 2015

Medicare Enrollment

General enrollment in Medicare is open from Jan. 1 through March 31, but don’t confuse the general enrollment period with your eligibility enrollment period: You are eligible to enroll in Medicare three months before you turn 65, the month of your 65th birthday, and three months after the month you turn 65.

You will be penalized if you enroll outside of your eligibility period and your options to enroll will be limited.

If you miss your eligibility window, you may sign up only during the general enrollment period at the beginning of the year, with few exceptions. And, if Social Security records reflect that you have enrolled late, you will be required to pay a penalty in addition to the monthly premium. The penalty for enrolling late is 10 percent for each year you delay enrollment in Medicare Part B.

For most USPS retirees, the premium for Medicare Part B for 2015 is $104.90. Medicare B covers medically-necessary services from doctors and other health care providers, ambulance services, outpatient care, home health care, and some preventative services. For a complete list of covered services, visit www.Medicare.gov.

Medicare Part A covers hospitalization and it’s free because you paid for it while you worked for the Postal Service. You are eligible for Medicare Part A if you are over 65, under 65 with certain disabilities, or currently receiving Social Security benefits. If you are covered by the Federal Employees Health Benefits Plan (FEHBP) you will not be penalized if you sign-up for Medicare Part A after age 65.

The questions asked most frequently about Medicare are:

How do I enroll? - You can sign up for Medicare by visiting your local Social Security office or by completing an online application at www.socialsecurity.gov. You may also call to request an appointment to enroll by phone by calling 1-800-772-1213; TTY/TDD: 1-877-486-2048.

How do I make the payment for Medicare Part B? - There is a range of options for paying Medicare premiums. You may pay by automatic bill payment through your bank account (also known as Medicare Easy Pay), by check, or the payments may be withheld from your Social Security or annuity benefit. Be clear with Social Security on the payment method you select to avoid a delay in processing your first payments.

Should I keep my Federal Employee Health Benefits Plan and enroll in Medicare Parts A and B as well? - That’s a personal decision; when weighing your options, you should consider your usage of medical services, your ability to pay, and the penalty for enrolling late in Medicare Part B. When you retain your FEHB Plan and enroll in Medicare A and B, Medicare will be your primary payer and your FEHB Plan will cover most of the difference. APWU retirees who are in the APWU Health Plan have expressed appreciation for having both Medicare and our health plan. If you have a FEHB plan other than APWU, you should contact your FEHB plan for advice.

When does Medicare take effect? The date coverage begins depends on when you enrolled. If you enrolled during your 65th birthday enrollment period, coverage starts the first day of your birth month, unless your birthday is on the first day of the month; if your birthday is on the first day of the month, the coverage starts on the prior month. If you enrolled the month after your 65th, there is a delay of one month for each month you delay in getting coverage after turning 65. For example, if you wait one month after your birth month to sign up, coverage will start two months after you sign up. Finally, if you sign up during the general enrollment period, coverage starts on July 1 of that year.

For more information about Medicare, call 1-800-772-1213 or visit www.Medicare.gov.


Life After the Post Office
Mar 26, 2014

Life After the Post Office

by Rita Burns, Office Manager

            On March 20, 2014, I had the opportunity to experience retired life with 12 former MVS employees.  This group of men and women meet the third Thursday of every month at Great Scott's Eatery for breakfast and share their lives.  It was great to see so many people and even more enlightening to just sit back and listen to their stories.  The retirees who were in attendance in March were:  Kenneth Anderson – 2002, Bobby Lopez – 2003, Keith White – 2003, Tim Burns – 2004, Marie Worley – 2004, Vern Crooks – 2009, Ora King – 2009, Joe Colatti – 2010, Gary Anderson – 2011, Emmet Russ – 2012, Patrick Tarpy – 2013 and Marvin Lich, who is still currently an MVS employee.

            It was very heartwarming to see so many who came to share this special day.  We work many years along side fellow employees and with that we make many friends.  It is wonderful to see that these men and women care enough about each other that they keep in touch.  It is definitely something that does not take place a lot these days.  They are a jovial group and they really enjoy each other's company.  They always say that women can talk a mile a minute, but these men can definitely out talk most women I know!  May we all, one day, be able to experience life as these MVS retirees!!  Thanks to all of them for letting me be a part of their day!

         For photos of this breakfast, please go to the Photo Gallery and select the 'Retirees 2014' call-out.

/rb 

opeiu #30 

afl-cio


Making a List and Checking It Twice
Feb 05, 2014
APWU

Making a List and Checking It Twice

Judy Beard, Director Retirees Department

(This article appears in the January-February 2014 edition of The American Postal Worker.)

Retirees were smart. We started planning for the 2014 elections right after the 2012 presidential election. We began by paying close attention to the public statements of elected officials about issues that impact our wallets, our families and the people in our communities.

Now that we’re closer to the midterm elections, which take place Nov. 4, 2014, it’s time for retirees to increase our involvement and start taking aggressive steps to protect our benefits. In approximately 11 months, every member of the House and 33 members of the Senate will be up for election. Gubernatorial races also will be held in 36 states and three territories.

Let’s all begin by making a list of contacts who will be our support network in the upcoming election. The list should include family members, friends, neighbors, and people we know in community organizations, along with their names, phone numbers, home and email addresses.

Our goal is to provide the people on our list with information about issues and help with voter registration, absentee ballot information, and poll locations and hours.

Retirees must step up our political participation because we have seen too many attacks on seniors in recent years. Many congressional representatives may think that by the time Election Day arrives, we will have forgotten who on the ballot favored cutting Social Security, Medicare, federal retirement programs, healthcare benefits and other “entitlement programs.” They refuse to accept the fact that our benefits are not the cause of the nation’s deficit.

Fifty-one Republicans were bold enough to call for cuts in Social Security in an Oct. 8, 2013, letter to House Speaker John Boehner. They wrote:

“We believe that the ongoing fiscal discussions in Congress provide an opportunity to address entitlement program deficits.”

“Many budget advocacy organizations on all sides of the political spectrum have stated recently that Social Security is the most straightforward entitlement program to address.”

“Virtually everyone recognizes that our nation’s entitlement programs are the primary, long-term drivers of our debt.”

(To read the entire letter, visit http://tinyurl.com/psply6q.) The signers’ names are listed below. Is your representative on the list?

State     U.S. Representative

State     U.S. Representative

AL           Mo Brooks

AR          Steve Womack

AR          Tim Griffin

CA          Devin Nunes

CA          Doug LaMalfa

CA          John Campbell

CO          Cory Gardner

CO          Scott Tipton

FL            Dennis Ross

FL            Jeff Miller

FL            Richard Nugent

FL            Ron DeSantis

FL            Steve Southerland

FL            Ted Yoho

FL            Tom Rooney

GA          Austin Scott

GA          Phil Gingrey

GA          Rob Woodall

IL             Aaron Schock

IL             Adam Kinzinger

IL             John Shimkus

IL             Randy Hultgren

IN           Marlin Stutzman

IN           Todd Rokita

IN           Todd Young

KY           Andy Barr

MD         Andy Harris

MI          Bill Huizenga

MO        Vicky Hartzler

MS         Alan Nunnelee

MS         Steven Palazzo

ND          Kevin Cramer

NV          Mark Amodei

NY          Tom Reed

OH          Bob Gibbs

OH          Jim Renacci

OH          Steve Stivers

OK          Jim Bridenstine

OK          Markwayne Mullin

PA          Glenn Thompson

PA          Mike Kelly

SC           Mick Mulvaney

SC           Tom Rice

TN          Marsha Blackburn

TX           Bill Flores

UT          Chris Stewart

UT          Jason Chaffetz

VA          Scott Rigell

WI          Reid Ribble

WI          Tom Petri

WY         Cynthia Lummis       

        


We cannot continue to elect officials who try to balance the budget on the backs of seniors. We must make sure everyone on our contact list is registered to vote, has the proper ID, knows the issues, and votes for candidates who support our families.


About the APWU Retirees Department
Jan 08, 2014
APWU

About the APWU Retirees Department

The APWU Retirees Department is the voice of retired APWU members — within the union and on Capitol Hill.

Retirees helped build the union as we fought for — and won — better wages, improved benefits, and the right to be treated with dignity and respect.

Now, the union fights for retirees as Congress makes budget and policy decisions that affect our pensions and healthcare coverage, and that impact our lives in a profound way. The Retirees Department seeks to organize retired APWU members to join in these struggles.

The department also provides members with opportunities to see old friends — and make new ones— by participating in the activities of APWU Retiree Chapters and other union events.

The APWU Retirees Department was established in 1992 by delegates to the union’s 11th Biennial National Convention. Our goal was to bring retirees back into the union family while advancing the objectives of retired and active union members. The creation of the department required the passage of an amendment to the APWU Constitution and Bylaws, approved by more than two-thirds of voting delegates.

At subsequent conventions, delegates amended the constitution to strengthen the voice of retirees in union affairs, voting to allow retirees to elect five regional Retirees National Convention Delegates; to improve funding of retiree chapters, and to allow members of the APWU Retirees Department to elect the department director, beginning with the 2007 election of national officers.

Currently, there are more than 80,000 APWU Retirees Department members, 39local Retiree chapters, and four state chapters.


Useful Links
Jul 07, 2011
.
Retirement Annuity Computation
Jul 07, 2011
Retirement Annuity Calculation Use one of the worksheets below to develop an estimation of your retirement annuity.


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